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  #651  
Old 04-04-2018, 12:27 AM
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NYPD Blue Creator Steven Bochco Dead at 74
by MEG SWERTLOW | Sun., Apr. 1, 2018 6:16 PM



Legendary television producer Steven Bochco, who created a list of shows including Hill Street Blues, L.A. Law and NYPD Blue, died at home on Sunday morning, E! News can confirm. The TV icon was 74.

A rep released the following statement to E! News, "On behalf of the Bochco family, we write to let you know that Steven passed away on Sunday morning, April 1st 2018 at 10:20 am. Steven fought cancer with strength, courage, grace and his unsurpassed sense of humor. He died peacefully in his sleep with is family close by. Details regarding memorial service will be forthcoming. In the meantime, the family asks for privacy during this time."

The 10-time Emmy winner suffered from leukemia and received a stem cell transplant from an anonymous 23-year-old in late 2014.

In addition to creating multiple gritty cop shows, Bochco also created Neil Patrick Harris' star-making vehicle, Doogie Howser, M.D. and most recently the TNT drama Murder in the First.

It was his vision, style, taste and tenacity that made me love watching TV. It was being on #NYPDBlue that made me love working on TV. Thank you and rest well Steven Bochco. You were one of a kind.

https://t.co/jTqhyAuO0k
— Sharon Lawrence (@sharonlawrence) April 2, 2018
Soon after news of his death surfaced, former NYPD Blue star Sharon Lawrence took to Twitter and wrote, "It was his vision, style, taste and tenacity that made me love watching TV. It was being on #NYPDBlue that made me love working on TV. Thank you and rest well Steven Bochco. You were one of a kind."

In addition to his plethora of Emmy Award accolades, Bochco won four Peabody Awards during his lifetime.

Bochco is survived by his wife, a son and a daughter.

The Hollywood Reporter was the first outlet to report this story.

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  #652  
Old 04-15-2018, 06:54 PM
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  #653  
Old 04-16-2018, 07:25 PM
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  #654  
Old 04-18-2018, 10:02 AM
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R. Lee Ermey, Harsh Drill Instructor in ‘Full Metal Jacket,’ Dies at 74
By MATT STEVENS APRIL 15, 2018




R. Lee Ermey, a former Marine whose barking, foulmouthed drill instructor in Stanley Kubrick’s “Full Metal Jacket” highlighted a decades-long career in which he frequently portrayed authority figures, died on Sunday morning in a hospital in Santa Monica, Calif. He was 74.

His longtime manager, Bill Rogin, said the cause was complications of pneumonia.

Mr. Ermey, who was nicknamed the Gunny, earned a Golden Globe nomination for best supporting actor with his performance as Gunnery Sergeant Hartman in “Full Metal Jacket,” released in 1987.

In a memorable opening monologue, Mr. Ermey’s character berates fear-stricken military recruits, hurling an avalanche of verbal insults that are both inventive and demeaning. His eyes bulging and his

jaw square, he renames one recruit “Private Snowball,” punches another in the gut and chokes a third to stop him from smiling.

Later in the film, Mr. Ermey’s character admonishes a recruit, asking rhetorically in a now famous line, “What is your major malfunction?”

Mr. Ermey, whose dozens of acting credits included film and television roles, was also well-known for playing Sheriff Hoyt in the 2003 horror film “The Texas Chainsaw Massacre.” He notably portrayed a police captain in the 1995 crime drama “Se7en” and was the voice of a green plastic solder named Sarge in the “Toy Story” franchise.

Ronald Lee Ermey was born on March 24, 1944, in Emporia, Kan., and moved to Washington State at age 11. He enlisted in the Marines immediately after graduating from high school and intended to spend decades in the military.

Much of the torrent of vicious language he unleashed in “Full Metal Jacket” was recalled from his days in boot camp and his 30 months as a Marine Corps drill instructor during the Vietnam War.

The clever, if obscene, tirades were of his own invention, Mr. Ermey told The New York Times in 1987.

“It was terrifying to those actors,” he said of the invective he spewed. “My objective was intimidation.”

Mr. Ermey’s 11-year career as a Marine was ended “by a rocket” in 1969, he said, but he would not talk about the war for the Times article, saying, “If a person’s wife and children were killed in a terrible automobile accident, 20 years later it will bother him to talk about it.”

With shrapnel still lodged in his back and arm, Mr. Ermey spent four months in a hospital. He eventually moved to the Philippines, where he married, attended college briefly and acted in television commercials.

He is survived by his wife, Marianila Ermey; his brothers Jack Ermey and Terry Ermey; his children Kim Bolt, Rhonda Chilton, Anna Liza Cruz, Betty Ermey, Evonne Ermey and Clinton Ermey; and grandchildren and great-grandchildren.

By the late 1970s, Mr. Ermey had landed one of his first movie roles, as a helicopter pilot in Francis Ford Coppola’s “Apocalypse Now.” He also served as a military adviser for the film.

He told The Times that he had given up “a good job and more money” — a supervisory role at a nuclear power plant that was under construction — for the part in “Full Metal Jacket” a few years later.

“I love being in front of the camera,” he said. “I get to play cowboy.”

Correction: April 16, 2018
An earlier version of this obituary described incorrectly an action by R. Lee Ermey’s character, Gunnery Sergeant Hartman, in the film “Full Metal Jacket.” Sergeant Hartman punches a recruit in the gut; he does not knee him in the groin.

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  #655  
Old 04-18-2018, 10:13 AM
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Milos Forman, 86, Dies; Won Oscars for ‘Cuckoo’s Nest’ and ‘Amadeus’
By MICHAEL CIEPLYAPRIL 14, 2018




Milos Forman, a filmmaker who challenged Hollywood with his subversive touch and twice directed movies that won the Oscar for best picture, died on Friday in a hospital in Danbury, Conn. He was 86.

His death was confirmed by Dennis Aspland, Mr. Forman’s agent. No cause was given. Mr. Forman lived in northwest Connecticut, in Warren.

Mr. Forman came to the United States from what was then Czechoslovakia in the late 1960s as a rebellious young filmmaker whose satirical bent had been little welcomed at home in the wake of the 1968 Soviet invasion.

Just a few years later, Mr. Forman’s “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” — an adaptation of Ken Kesey’s tragicomic novel of revolt and repression in a mental institution — won five Oscars, including

those for best director and best picture.

The film put Mr. Forman in the front rank of directors who struggled to make big, commercial films with countercultural sensibilities. His sympathy for the odd man out was always apparent, even as his
movies grew in scope.

“Amadeus,” a 1984 adaptation of Peter Shaffer’s stage play, presented Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart as a genius who undermined authority with his art. Again, Oscars for best director and best picture were among its many honors.

Still, Mr. Forman, by then a United States citizen, said one of his greatest pleasures from the film — which was shot in Czechoslovakia — had been the chance to return in triumph to his Communist-controlled homeland.

“I’ve always done everything in my life to win,” he said of himself in “Turnaround: A Memoir” (1994), written with Jan Novak.

Mr. Forman was caught up in the turmoil of occupation not many years after his birth on Feb. 18, 1932, in Caslav, Czechoslovakia. As a boy he witnessed Germany’s invasion in 1939.

Both his mother, born Anna Suabova, and the man he believed to be his father, a teacher named Rudolf Forman, were separately seized by the Germans and killed in death camps.

For years, Mr. Forman vaguely told interviewers that he believed himself to be half-Jewish, though both parents attended a Protestant church. It was his co-writer, Mr. Novak, in researching “Turnaround,” who ended the mystery.

After the 1964 release of his first feature film, “Black Peter” — about the misadventures of a teenager beginning his work life — Mr. Forman was contacted by a woman who had been with his mother in Auschwitz, Mr. Novak learned. The woman explained that Mr. Forman was actually the son of a Jewish architect with whom Mr. Forman’s mother had had an affair. Mr. Forman eventually found his biological father, who had survived the war and moved to Ecuador.

Reared by foster parents, Mr. Forman attended film school in Prague. He made his mark with a film and theater presentation at the 1958 Brussels World Exhibition. An early feature, “The Loves of a Blonde,” won attention on the international festival circuit in 1965.

Another film two years later, “The Firemen’s Ball,” rubbed Czech officials the wrong way with its spoof of the firefighting bureaucracy. By then, though, Mr. Forman was turning to opportunities abroad.

When the Soviet Union invaded in August 1968, Mr. Forman was in Paris negotiating to make a Hollywood film. That movie, his first American feature, a youth comedy called “Taking Off,” was released
by Universal Pictures in 1971. It did so poorly, Mr. Forman said, that he wound up owing the studio $500.

Through the early 1970s, Mr. Forman — a hearty bon vivant without means for the good life at the time — went through a period of self-described depression. For much of that time he holed up in the storied Chelsea Hotel in Manhattan, sleeping through the days and communicating with émigré friends.

By then he had been married twice, first to an actress, Jana Brejchova, then to another performer, Vera Kresadlova, who had remained in Czechoslovakia with their two sons, Petr and Matej.

In addition to those sons, he is survived by Martina Formanova, his third wife; and his twin sons, James and Andrew, with Ms. Formanova.

In his memoir, Mr. Forman said the producers of “Cuckoo’s Nest,” Michael Douglas and Saul Zaentz, sought him out because “I seemed to be in their price range.” In fact, they had made a prudent match between filmmaker and material, the Kesey novel.

Jack Nicholson was the movie’s star. But Mr. Forman — who liked to coax star performances out of lesser-known actors — did exactly that with Louise Fletcher, who won an Oscar for her portrayal of the dictatorial Nurse Ratched.

“Hair,” a 1979 adaptation of the counterculture Broadway musical, and “Ragtime,” which came next, in 1981, a film version of the E. L. Doctorow novel, with James Cagney, left less impression. But

they kept Mr. Forman on the list of directors whom executives were willing to trust with more sophisticated projects.

In 1978, Mr. Forman joined Frantisek Daniel, another Czech, as co-director of the film program at Columbia University’s school of the arts.

It was for Mr. Zaentz that Mr. Forman next struck gold, with “Amadeus.” The film won eight Oscars; besides the ones for best picture and best director, F. Murray Abraham won the best actor award. (Tom Hulce, as the title character, was nominated for that prize.)

But the film left Mr. Forman with a bittersweet, and ultimately correct, sense that his career had peaked, he wrote.

In 1989, five years after “Amadeus,” Mr. Forman released “Valmont,” a costume drama, starring Colin Firth and Annette Bening, based on an 18th-century novel by Pierre Ambroise François Choderlos

de Laclos. But it was overshadowed by the previous year’s release of the better-received “Dangerous Liaisons,” a film by Stephen Frears with Glenn Close and John Malkovich that used the same underlying material.

Mr. Forman next made a series of films that pushed Hollywood out of its comfort zone.

“The People vs. Larry Flynt” pressed the limits of tolerance for an antihero with its sympathetic portrait of the Hustler magazine publisher Larry Flynt. Released by Columbia Pictures in 1996, it was a box-office bust, with domestic ticket sales of only about $20 million.

In 1999, “Man on the Moon,” Mr. Forman’s complex portrait of the comic Andy Kaufman, did only a little better for Universal Pictures.

Shortly before its release, he married Martina Zborilova, who had worked with him as a production assistant. They named their twin sons after Mr. Kaufman and Jim Carrey, the movie’s star.

Mr. Forman’s next film, “Goya’s Ghosts,” for Samuel Goldwyn Films, was an intricate portrait of the artist during an era of Napoleonic conquest and religious persecution in Spain. The film, starring Javier Bardem and Natalie Portman, found a minuscule audience when it was released on American screens in 2007.

But it appeared to play out themes from Mr. Forman’s life, as its heroine, an artist’s model, is imprisoned and tortured because of what were claimed to be her hidden Jewish roots and habits.

In an interview with The Star Tribune of Minneapolis, Mr. Forman talked of Goya’s vacillation between unfettered expression and a desire to please in terms that recalled a tension between his own artistic urges and the lure of success.

“Torn between protest and preservation,” Mr. Forman said of Goya, “he is the most courageous coward.”

Correction: April 16, 2018
An earlier version of this obituary misstated where Mr. Forman shot the film “Amadeus.” It was Czechoslovakia — not the Czech Republic, which did not exist until 1993, nine years after “Amadeus”

was released. The earlier version also referred incorrectly to Mr. Forman’s biological father. He moved from Czechoslovakia to Ecuador, not Peru, but he was not living in South America when Mr.

Forman found him in the 1960s; he had moved again, to New York, in 1945.

Hana de Goeij contributed reporting from Valtice, Czech Republic, and Daniel E. Slotnik from New York.

[code]https://www.nytimes.com/2018/04/14/obituaries/milos-forman-dead.html[ /CODE]
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Old 04-18-2018, 10:18 AM
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Harry Anderson, 65, ‘Night Court’ Actor Who Bottled Magic Onscreen and Off, Dies
By MAYA SALAM APRIL 16, 2018



Harry Anderson, who starred as the kindhearted, zany Judge Harry Stone on the long-running NBC comedy “Night Court,” was found dead early Monday at his home in Asheville, N.C. He was 65.

The Asheville Police Department, which confirmed the death, did not specify the cause but said foul play was not suspected. Turk Pipkin, a longtime friend, said Mr. Anderson had been hospitalized with the flu a few months ago and had remained sick.

Mr. Anderson, who spent nine seasons presiding over a fictional Manhattan courtroom that played host to a steady stream of oddballs, was nominated for three consecutive Emmys, from 1985 to 1987.

“Night Court,” which ran from 1984 to 1992, more than held its own against juggernauts like “Cheers,” “The Cosby Show” and “The Golden Girls” during a storied period for sitcoms.

It was nominated for 31 Emmys and won seven. John Larroquette, Markie Post, Richard Moll, Charles Robinson and Marsha Warfield starred alongside Mr. Anderson.

Judge Harry Stone shared more than a first name with the actor who played him: Both the character and the man wore colorful ties, were magicians at heart and were superfans of the singer Mel Tormé, who made several guest appearances on “Night Court.” Mr. Anderson delivered a eulogy at Mr. Tormé’s funeral in 1999.

While he earned critical acclaim and amassed a devoted fan base on “Night Court,” Mr. Anderson never fancied himself an actor. “I’m a magician, or a performer, by nature, and that’s always what I’ve been,” he told WGN-TV in Chicago in 2014.

“I was never really an actor,” he said. “I was a magician who fell into a part on ‘Cheers.’ ”

His role as the swindler Harry (the Hat) Gittes on “Cheers” — he appeared in six episodes, four in the show’s first two seasons — led to his break on “Night Court” after he impressed Brandon Tartikoff, the president of NBC.

Mr. Anderson’s “Cheers” character echoed his real life as well. In 1985, he told People magazine that he used to run a classic street hustle, the shell game, in San Francisco, where, at 21, he had his jaw broken by an opponent who was livid at the game’s outcome.

Mr. Anderson, one of three children, was born on Oct. 14, 1952, in Newport, R.I., and spent much of his childhood on the move, often performing on the streets for money, he told People. He had lived in many cities, including Chicago, New York, St. Louis and New Orleans, by the time he landed in California at age 16. From there he found success as a comic magician, which opened the door to his acting career.

About his mother, he said to People: “She was a hustler, yeah. She did a lot of things. We moved around a lot, and she had a lot of men friends.”

But he said his childhood was not bad, adding that his dubious background should not be viewed any differently from his mother’s.

“I respect my mother; she was very concerned with taking care of us,” he said. “She did what needed to be done to try to keep us together. People find my criminal days amusing, but they find her background shocking. I don’t draw any line.”

Mr. Anderson told People that his father was a salesman who was mostly absent from his life, and that he had not seen him for 15 years before his death.

Mr. Anderson is survived by his wife, the former Elizabeth Morgan, and two children from his first marriage, to Leslie Pollack: Eva Fay Anderson, a writer and producer in Los Angeles; and Dashiell Anderson, a teacher.

In his late teens and early 20s, Mr. Anderson traveled the country performing magic. During a stint in Austin, Tex., about 45 years ago, he was performing on the street when he met someone else entertaining passers-by: a juggler named Turk Pipkin.

The chance encounter led to a lifelong friendship and business partnership. Mr. Anderson and Mr. Pipkin performed together across the United States, and when Mr. Anderson decided he wanted to try acting in Hollywood, Mr. Pipkin followed him.

“We were making it up as we went along,” Mr. Pipkin said in an interview on Tuesday. “When he gathered a crowd, people were just mesmerized. People just couldn’t look away.”

Mr. Anderson appeared on “Saturday Night Live” several times in the 1980s. He hosted the show at the height of his fame, in 1985.

After “Night Court,” Mr. Anderson felt burned out, so he moved with his first wife and their children to Washington State. But CBS lured him back into television a few years later with an offer to play the newspaper columnist Dave Barry on the comedy “Dave’s World,” which ran from 1993 to 1997.

In 2008, he appeared in an episode of “30 Rock” titled “The One With the Cast of ‘Night Court.’ ”

In 2000 Mr. Anderson moved to New Orleans, eager to return to his roots. It was there that Mr. Pipkin introduced him to Ms. Morgan. Once married, the Andersons opened the nightclub Oswald’s Speakeasy, where he performed, as well as a magic and curiosity shop, Sideshow.

Mr. Anderson at first refused to leave New Orleans during Hurricane Katrina in 2005, opting to stay in Oswald’s in the French Quarter while the storm battered the city, Mr. Pipkin said. He evacuated only when the firefighters stationed nearby said they were leaving.

After Katrina, tourism flagged. Mr. Anderson disagreed with the city’s plans for rebuilding, Mr. Pipkin said.

He and his wife had also become captive to the depression that affected many in New Orleans at the time, Mr. Anderson told The New York Times in 2006. Despite efforts to support their community — Mr. Anderson opened his club for what he called French Quarter Town Hall meetings — and maintain their businesses, they chose to call it quits.

The Andersons took a weeklong vacation in Asheville, where they fell in love with an old house and decided to buy it.

“I’m glad we tried to stay” in New Orleans, Mr. Anderson said, “but I don’t want to be the person I will be if I stay here.”
Matthew Haag and John Schwartz contributed reporting.

[code]https://www.nytimes.com/2018/04/16/obituaries/harry-anderson-dead-night-court.html[code]
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Old 04-21-2018, 04:23 PM
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Verne Troyer, Known for 'Austin Powers' Role, Has Died at 49



Verne Troyer, the actor best known for his role as Mini-Me in the "Austin Powers" movies, died Saturday. He was 49.

News of Troyers' death was posted to his official Facebook page Saturday afternoon.

"It is with great sadness and incredibly heavy hearts to write that Verne passed away today," the post says. "Verne was an extremely caring individual. He wanted to make everyone smile, be happy, and laugh.

Anybody in need, he would help to any extent possible. Verne hoped he made a positive change with the platform he had and worked towards spreading that message everyday."

"Verne was also a fighter when it came to his own battles," the post later went on to say. "Over the years he’s struggled and won, struggled and won, struggled and fought some more, but unfortunately this time was too much."

A cause of death was not immediately indicated.

.
__________________
Quitting Facebook is going to be harder than quitting crack, cigarettes, and horse all rolled together.
I meant whores. The Android speech module sucks.

Last edited by amtronic : 04-21-2018 at 04:25 PM.
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